The best move a successful event planner can make to grab the attention of prospective clients is presenting an effective and comprehensive event proposal template. Mastering the skill of making a good event proposal sample will make you a front-runner in the event planning competition.

Planning an event involves a lot of study and attention to details, organization, scheduling, and follow-up. If you present your client an event proposal letter that is well-formatted, this will impress your client, and he would also recognize in you the necessary skills required to handle his events or activities. Learning how to write an event proposal would entail an understanding of all the requirements of your client.

Event Proposal Templates

Examples of events where you may need an event proposal template

Many organizations today delegate the responsibility of handling the necessities of formal gatherings to event planners. The first step is to make an event planning proposal template which could either be for a personal or business function. Highlighting the key points of the event is the main key to a good event proposal.

Planners usually already have a template for any event planning proposal because such can make their design look more professional, not to mention the time saved in planning. Furthermore, event proposal samples and event proposal template such as this one are readily accessible. Here is a list of the most common events where planners can use such a proposal:

Event Proposal Samples

Important elements of an event proposal template

Details are important when planning an event proposal letter and how much details will, of course, depend upon the importance and the scale of the affair. Fortunately, most proposals have similar components. Listed below are the basic aspects that event proposals usually contain, although there could be more:

Event description

This mainly involves the event’s theme. The proposal should give an overview to the reader on what the affair is all about. In some cases, the event will not need too much explaining since they’re common. But a planner shouldn’t take things for granted. A good planner shouldn’t just depend solely on the event’s title to carry out its message.

Your experience as the planner

The entity or organization making a bid for the event must extol their capability and experience as bidders. It’s essential that the one who assesses the bidders will make sure that they will put on a good performance. They should ensure that the proposal will contain concise and relevant information regarding the event management experiences of the team submitting the proposal.

The venue and all of its facilities

The venue of the event should also be a major point of consideration. First of all, it should suit the affair. The planner should list in detail all the available facilities in the venue, like toilets, car-parking spaces, and more. If you’re holding the event indoors, take these into account and if possible, describe them in detail:

If the event is outdoors, consider and describe the following:

  • the maintenance level of the venue
  • seating of the spectators
  • any shaded areas where the guests can stay
  • fencing
  • drainage
  • floodlighting is also worth mentioning

For either venue, the number of dressing rooms and the condition for the participants is also important. Good planners should include in their proposals a floor diagram or map of the venue too.

The program

Generally, the hosting club or organization has very little to say in creating the program, especially after they’ve already set the date. Nevertheless, the event proposal can include a suggestion for a program to have a flow of how the whole event will progress. An important item that the decision maker should know is the number of hours they can use the venue for.

The proposed budget for the event

Include a draft of a budget of probable expenditure or income in the proposal. The budget, needless to say, should be realistic and, therefore, will need some careful consideration, especially when suggesting sponsors who have yet to formalize a sponsorship agreement. The budget shouldn’t show any kind of loss when you’ve already taken into account the projected expenditure and income.

Event Proposal Letters

Helpful tips for writing an event proposal template

The thought of building a proposal should feel exciting, especially if you’re making entertainment proposal templates, concert proposal template or any other proposals which would indicate new business for you. But for most people, creating the proposal itself might feel exhausting and even frustrating as it would entail hours of work.

For the more experienced, there are some ways to prevent this fatigue while making the job of writing the proposal a lot easier. To do this, you can design a template to use that can be repurposed every next time. No two events are identical, but they would always have common grounds between them. Here are some tips on how to create an effective event proposal template:

Gather all the data you need

Good event planners won’t feel content with the resources they have, and they aren’t afraid to ask for help if they need clarification. If you base your proposal on data that you’re unsure of, this may translate into confusion when you start writing your event proposal template. At a minimum, the most importing things to consider are your client’s budget, his authority to make decisions, what the client needs, and the event’s timeline. With these in hand, you can start to make your draft.

Draft an overview of the proposal

This is pretty basic. At the onset of the draft, state the event’s most relevant details. A good practice is to add a version number, in case you need to make revisions after delivering the proposal. In an ideal situation, you would deal with a decision-maker right from the beginning. However, if you’re dealing with a lower representative, you may have to make some revisions. Versioning will help you and your client keep track of any changes.

Demonstrate why the client should select you

You and your planning team will display the main competencies of your event planning experiences before your client. You can also use other client testimonials, referrals or reviews to buttress your claims. As the event planner, you can articulately communicate to your client your perception of what he needs along with how you will carry them out.

Consider the event’s audience, goals, and concept

After getting your client’s attention, this next tip will be the real substance of your event proposal. Events carry out specific goals, and it’s your job to find ways to connect these goals with the attendees. It’s great to have a breathtaking venue or delicious food, but the main purpose is to send the message to the attendees. A failure to do this will be a tremendous waste of time, resources, and energy. Therefore, think about the:

  • Audience
    Define who the guests are, where they’re from, and what their relationship is to your client.
  • Goals
    For this, you need to concentrate on emphasizing what your client wants his audience to do than make this actionable.
  • Concept
    Explain what you plan to do to connect the audience to the event’s goals.

The scope of the event and the services you’ll provide

If your services encompass all of the phases of an event, then each event may have a lot of similarities. However, just like other event planners, what you do along with what you offer may shift based on your client’s requirements. Expound in detail what you will do, who you work with, and how you would get in touch with everyone.

The design elements

This is your chance to display your creative ideas. There are no specific rules on how to do this. You should not go beyond the bounds of propriety. Make your designs innovative and lively by showing off some primary renderings with appealing colors. This will get your client’s attention, and he can start picturing what the event will look like.

Make an initial timeline

At this stage, you have already addressed the majority of the client’s decisions, what his needs are, and the timeline. Here, you can thresh out the most important milestones in the proposal. Always keep this in mind to help push your client to a clearer image of his event.

Assumptions

You may have gathered enough information before writing your proposal, but there will always be some grey areas in the proposal’s early stages. Here, you might have to do some guesswork. It will help if you include these assumptions when you submit your proposal. This will give your client the chance to either correct or confirm such assumptions, if necessary.

An estimation of the budget

This section will require numbers and computations. Everything boils down to a number of line items after all the planning. When dealing with numbers, be both transparent and specific. Based on your plans, inform your client about the cost of services, equipment, and labor.

Ask your client to sign

Giving the client the chance to affix his signature and agree with your proposal is a good idea. It would spare you the unnecessary revisions.

Event Planning Proposal Templates

TemplateLab May 4th, 2019